"The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Espaço dedicado à nona arte, desde a franco-belga aos comics norte-americanos passando pelo mangá, desde mainstream a independente.
User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

"The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 11 Sep 2014 00:07

O jornal escocês Herald elaborou uma lista com o título "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time". De acordo com o jornal, foram questionadas um conjunto de personalidades para a elaboração da mesma. O resultado é uma lista bastante elitista (com a novidade de ter um número muito apreciável de BD contemporânea), mas com a qual me identifico bastante.

The 50 greatest graphic novels of all time
Teddy Jamieson

This is now, finally, the age of the graphic novel.
The humble comic-strip can trace its origins to Hogarth and the painters of Japan's Edo period, but for most of the 20th century it was regarded as a second-rate pulp form.
That reputation has changed dramatically in recent years. Now, the graphic novel (a catch-all term at best) has embraced Pulitzer Prize-winning memoirs, hard-hitting journalism and astute social commentary. Cartoonists get nominated for the Costa Prize and the Edinburgh International Book Festival has a whole strand - Stripped - dedicated to graphic fiction.
So we thought we'd ask cartoonists, novelists, critics, publishers, journalists, comic historians, comedians and the odd musician what books should be in everybody's library.


Here are the 50 graphic novels you need to read.


50 Heavy Liquid, Paul Pope (1999)

Day-after-tomorrow sci-fi drawn with a spidery flair and dynamism.


49 Sin City, Frank Miller (1993)

Morally dubious, artistically thrilling. Mickey Spillane on drugs.


48 Barefoot Gen, Keiji Nakazawa (1973)

A harrowing account of Hiroshima as told by one of its survivors.


47 The Arrival, Shaun Tan (2006)

Australian cartoonist Tan's wordless fable tells the story of the immigrant experience in dusty black and white.


46 Tamara Drewe, Posy Simmonds (2005)

Simmonds's contemporary take on Hardy's Far From The Madding Crowd.


44= Goliath, Tom Gauld (2012)

The story of David and Goliath, as told from the giant's perspective. Bittersweet comedy from the Scottish cartoonist.


44= Blacksad, Juan Diaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido (2002)

Raymond Chandler via Walt Disney, with a feline private eye.


43 Summer Blonde, Adrian Tomine (2002)

Generation X disaffection laid down in crisp, clean lines.


42 Alec: The Years Have Pants (2009)

A monster compilation of Scots expat Eddie Campbell's autobiographical comics. A woozy, boozy life story.


41 Fluffy, Simone Lia (2003)

The story of a baby rabbit, this plays with cuteness and whimsy but never feels sickly sweet.


40 The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, Stephen Collins (2013)

Collins's darkly humorous fable about order and chaos via beardiness.


39 Krazy Kat (1913-1944)

George Herriman's scratchy, funny, beautifully idiosyncratic comic strip was loved by Picasso and the poet EE Cummings.


38 Everything We Miss, Luke Pearson (2011)

The story of the end of a relationship is both intimate and cosmic in scale.


36 = It Was The War Of The Trenches, Jacques Tardi (1982)

Life in the trenches caught by the French cartoonist in horrifying detail.


36 = Blankets, Craig Thompson (2003)

Thompson's memoir takes on Christian fundamentalism, family ties and erotic love over 600 gorgeously rendered pages.


35 The Lagoon, Lili Carre (2008)

Family secrets and watery monsters. "No other comic I've read has had such a well-defined use of atmosphere or effective use of sound," says cartoonist Luke Pearson.


34 The Preacher, Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, (1995-2000)

Gross-out laughs, graphic violence and religion. Not for the faint-hearted.


33 The Complete Calvin And Hobbes, Bill Watterson (2005)

The best comic strip ever? Certainly the funniest.


32 Y: The Last Man, Brian K Vaughan and Pia Guerra (2002-2008)

The story of the last man alive in a world of women. Not a sex comedy.


31 My New York Diary, Julie Doucet (1999)

Doucet's New York memoir takes in sex, a suicide attempt and dirty socks. Life retold as the blackest of black comedies.


30 Buddha, Osamu Tezuka (1972-1983)

This biography of Buddha is an example of the ambition and sheer strangeness of manga.


29 Gemma Bovary, Posy Simmonds (1999)

An exquisite example of Simmonds's eye for detail and ear for dialogue.


28 The Nikopol Trilogy, Enki Bilal (1980-1992)

Dystopian science fiction bande desinee full of blue-haired girls and Egyptian Gods.


27 Dockwood, Jon McNaught (2012)

McNaught's patient, hushed draughtmanship and storytelling captures the poetry of everyday lives.


26 Nelson, Various Artists (2012)

Some 54 British cartoonists take it in turns to tell the story of the life of one woman from her birth to the present day. A giddy, poppy delight.


25 A Contract With God, Will Eisner (1978)

God, death and poverty in a 1930s New York tenement.


24 Gus And His Gang, Christophe Blain (2007)

In which the French cartoonist recreates the Wild West as a place of slapstick farce.


23 Tintin: Moon Adventure, Hergé (1953-1954)

Binding together two adventures, Destination Moon and Explorers On The Moon, Herge takes Tintin into space.


22 Fun Home, Alison Bechdel (2006)

The American cartoonist recounts her relationship with her father Bruce. A story of gay life then and now.


21 Pyongjang, Guy Delisle (2007)

A graphic travelogue about one of the most secretive societies in the world, North Korea.


20 Corto Maltese: Ballad Of The Salty Sea, Hugo Pratt (1967)

The first in a series of adventure stories that stand out for their historical accuracy and Pratt's handsome artistry.


19 Days Of The Bagnold Summer, Joff Winterhart (2012)

Winterhart's story of a mother and her metalhead son is one of the funniest and sweetest accounts of family life.


18 Asterios Polyp, David Mazzucchelli (2009)

Mazzucchelli started off drawing Batman comics before moving on this graphically innovative life story of a self-important architect, as told by his dead twin brother. "The kind of high-end intellectual pop that comics can do really well," says cartoonist Stephen Collins.


17 Building Stories, Chris Ware (2012)

Ware's most recent graphic novel comes in 14 different parts. Whatever order you read it in, this story of life in a Chicago apartment block will still break your heart.


16 It's A Good Life If You Don't Weaken, Seth (1996)

Canadian cartoonist Seth's graphic fiction is soaked in a nostalgia for a romanticised past. "When I picked this up in my early twenties it opened up my mind in terms of what words and pictures can do," says illustrator and novelist Leanne Shapton.


15 The Incal, Alejandro Jodorowsky and Moebius (2011)

A collaboration between France's greatest artist of the future and the cult film director of El Topo resulted in this mad, visionary French space opera from the 1980s.


14 Epileptic, David B (1996)

A memoir of two brothers, a story of illness and childhood imagination and an inky fever-dream of a book.


13 The Nao Of Brown, Glyn Dillon (2012)

Buddhism, OCD, alcoholism. A painted love story, a thing of beauty.


12 Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Frank Miller (1986)

The superhero recast as Dirty Harry in this wild, fierce, satirical take on the genre.


11 Akira, Katshuiro Otomo (1982-1990)

Set in Neo Tokyo in 2030, Otomo's huge, sprawling SF epic introduced Japanese manga to the west.


10 Palestine, Joe Sacco (1993)

The cartoonist as war-zone reporter. Joe Sacco's account of his visit to the Occupied Territories at the start of the 1990s is a powerful example of the potential of comic strips. Art Spiegelman said of Sacco's work: "In a world where Photoshop has outed the photograph as a liar, one can now allow artists to return to their original function - as reporters."


9 V For Vendetta, Alan Moore and David Lloyd (1982-1989)

Originally conceived during the political chill of Thatcherism, Alan Moore extrapolated a political future that saw Britain slide into fascism and then set against it anarchist "hero" V who begins his attack on the state by blowing up the Houses of Parliament. Complemented perfectly by the controlled grittiness of David Lloyd's art, this is the comic book as treatise on political belief system. Has gained real-world traction in recent years as members of Occupy have adopted V's Guy Fawkes mask.


8 Watchmen, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (1987)

Does the ending spoil it? Moore's intricately planned, complex reboot of the superhero genre may ultimately trip up over the pulpy melodrama of its climax. But this was a game-changer for graphic novels, opening reader's eyes to the form's potential visual and verbal literacy. Also contains possibly the best pirate story ever written.


7 Locas, Jaime Hernandez (1982-2013)

"Hernandez is North America's greatest living comics creator," says cartoonist Woodrow Phoenix. "He wears his command of every facet of sequential narrative so lightly that while you are seduced by his gorgeous drawings, you don't notice how densely and subtly told his stories are." And that's possibly underselling it. Hernandez's 30-year exploration of the life of Latina Maggie Chascarillo - from punk chica to middle-aged woman - is simply one of the greatest achievements in any form in those years.


6 From Hell, Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell (1999)

Moore's take on the Jack the Ripper story. Aided by Eddie Campbell's scratchy art, it's also an examination of the misogyny of Victorian values, an occult history and a psychogeographic exploration of London. A potent, perverse, black hole of a book that exerts a malign pull.


5 Ghost World, Daniel Clowes (1997)

The story of American teenagers Enid Coleslaw (it's an anagram) and Rebecca Doppelmeyer, Clowes's most successful work is an outsider's account of what it is to be an outsider, the fuzzy borderline between adolescence and adulthood, and the strangeness of suburbia. "Perfectly captures the weirdness and boredom of teenage life," suggests cartoonist Tom Gauld.


4 Black Hole, Charles Burns (2005)

If David Lynch did teen romance ... Charles Burns recasts adolescent sexuality as the stuff of sci-fi melodrama while taking Hergé's clean-line drawing style to the dark side. The result is creepily beautiful. "Black Hole is an unsettling book," says cartoonist Will Morris. "It teases your nerves and at times I'm sure I even felt a slight nausea."


3 Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid On Earth, Chris Ware (2000)

Eight years in the making, Ware's graphic novel may on the page look like the most formally precise title in this list, yet that perfection can be misleading. It moves so easily between the past and the present, reality and imagination that you can get lost in its labyrinth. "Sophisticated like free jazz," suggests Metraphrog cartoonist John Chalmers. "It changed the way I looked at the world, at comics, the way I drew," adds Stephen Collins.

2 Maus, Art Spiegelman (1991)

Possibly the most important title in our countdown. If Watchmen opened people's eyes to what you could do with superheroes, Spiegelman's memoir recalibrated what people expected from comics entirely. The son of a holocaust survivor, Spiegelman's graphic memoir tells his father's story. In Maus the Jews are mice and the Nazis are cats, a subversion of Nazi propaganda. The result, a Pulitzer Prize winner, is as good as comic books get. But it's not the winner.

1 Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi (2000)

In 1995, Marjane Satrapi was given a copy of Maus as a birthday present. She had no idea that you could tell stories in this way. And so she decided to tell hers. The result is this memoir of a punky, sarky girl in a veil in post-revolutionary Iran. It uses minimalist, at times childlike art to reveal a world - Tehran in the Khomeini years - most of us don't know much about, in all its complexity. "Probably the first comic I read and, like a lot of girls, it was the one that really got me into comics," says cartoonist Isabel Greenberg. If you haven't read a graphic novel before, start here.
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
Thanatos
Edição Única
Posts: 13870
Joined: 31 Dec 2004 22:36
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Thanatos » 11 Sep 2014 08:08

Sinto-me elitista. :P

Desses só falhei dois.
Não importa como, não importa quando, não importa onde, a culpa será sempre do T!

-- um membro qualquer do BBdE!

User avatar
pco69
Cópia & Cola
Posts: 5487
Joined: 29 Apr 2005 23:13
Location: Fernão Ferro
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby pco69 » 11 Sep 2014 08:32

49 Sin City, Frank Miller (1993)
tenho estado a obter e ler (via olx e similares) e confirmo que é excelente

47 The Arrival, Shaun Tan (2006)
Excelente

44= Blacksad, Juan Diaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido (2002)
Confirmo a excelencia, tanto deste como da série
Espero que a ASA não aparvalhe e continue a sua edição em Portugal

36 = It Was The War Of The Trenches, Jacques Tardi (1982)
Tenho-o já à alguns anos.
Já li um ou dois episódios, mas a sua crueza e falta de personagens com que me identifique, faz com que não o tenha lide de ponta a ponta ainda.

36 = Blankets, Craig Thompson (2003)
O Habibi é muito superior a este.


33 The Complete Calvin And Hobbes, Bill Watterson (2005)
Na minha opinião, há comic strips superiores a este a começar pelos Peanuts.

32 Y: The Last Man, Brian K Vaughan and Pia Guerra (2002-2008)
Continuo sem ter paciencia para seguir a história

28 The Nikopol Trilogy, Enki Bilal (1980-1992)
À algum tempo que penso na sua aquisição


23 Tintin: Moon Adventure, Hergé (1953-1954)
Se está aqui o Tintin, porque não está também o Lucky Luke ou Asterix? Possivelmente para a época e pelo seu 'pioneirismo', talvez mereça estar por aqui, mas para mim, as outras duas séries são superiores ao Tintin

15 The Incal, Alejandro Jodorowsky and Moebius (2011)
A série original ainda é superior à prequela e sequela, mas estas também merecem ser lidas.

8 Watchmen, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (1987)
Não lhe achei grande piada

1 Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi (2000)
Muito bom mesmo.
Fenómenos desencadeantes de enfarte do miocárdio

Esforços físicos, stress psíquico, digestão de alimentos, coito, tempo frio, vento de frente e esforços a princípio da manhã.

Ou seja, é extremamente perigoso fazer sexo ao ar livre com vento de frente, após ter tomado o pequeno almoço numa manhã de inverno...

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby annawen » 12 Sep 2014 15:20

Interessante lista e obrigada Ignatius pelo post :). Há aqui coisas que não conhecia. Tenho alguns que estão lá mas que ainda não li. Espanta-me o "Maus" estar em número 2 em relação a "Persepolis", mas como não li "Persepolis"...

Algumas considerações:

Não li muitos dos que estão aqui. Gosto imenso do Tintin mas para mim o melhor livro dele é "As Jóias de Castafiore". Não aprecio nada "Sin City", excepto o trabalho à volta do preto e branco. Gosto muito do Chris Ware mas há uma tristeza, quase pegajosa diria, nas histórias dele que as torna, por vezes, difícil de serem lidas. Preciso sempre de uns intervalos de tempo entre umas histórias e outras. Não me admira Alan Moore tão perto do topo. Admira-me um pouco ver "From Hell" mais bem cotado que "Watchmen". Uma vez que este é mais conhecido.

Ainda estou para terminar "Y". Um dia destes. Ou não. Talvez melhore a partir da 2ª metade.

"Krazy Kat" é fantástico. Uma das minhas bandas desenhadas preferidas. Por aqui começou a ser editada há uns anos pela Livros Horizonte, mas a edição ficou-se por 2 volumes que englobam a 2ª metade dos anos 30.

User avatar
pco69
Cópia & Cola
Posts: 5487
Joined: 29 Apr 2005 23:13
Location: Fernão Ferro
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby pco69 » 12 Sep 2014 15:43

Este tipo de post no BBdE ou noutros locais já agora :P , levam a:
Aquisição de:
Jimmy Corrigan - The Smartest Kid on Earth
Pinocchio
V for Vendetta
300

:rolleyes:
Fenómenos desencadeantes de enfarte do miocárdio

Esforços físicos, stress psíquico, digestão de alimentos, coito, tempo frio, vento de frente e esforços a princípio da manhã.

Ou seja, é extremamente perigoso fazer sexo ao ar livre com vento de frente, após ter tomado o pequeno almoço numa manhã de inverno...

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 14 Sep 2014 21:37

Thanatos wrote:Sinto-me elitista. :P

Desses só falhei dois.


Ainda és mais snob do que eu. :devil: Desta lista li 36.
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 14 Sep 2014 21:41

annawen wrote:Gosto muito do Chris Ware mas há uma tristeza, quase pegajosa diria, nas histórias dele que as torna, por vezes, difícil de serem lidas. Preciso sempre de uns intervalos de tempo entre umas histórias e outras.


Chris Ware é extraordinário. Embora a sua temática seja sempre a mesma, oportunidades perdidas, sonhos desfeitos, vidas desperdiçadas, o que é fascinante em Ware, é a forma como ele reproduz a experiência humana em toda a sua complexidade, riqueza e mundanidade, através de narrativas densas, quer na estrutura quer na história, com uma obsessão quase "doentia" pelo detalhe.
Os críticos americanos dizem que Ware está para BD, como James Joyce para a literatura, e eu acho que é uma comparação feliz.
Gosto tanto de Ware, que até comprei o boneco que está no meu avatar. :)
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 14 Sep 2014 21:45

pco69 wrote:Este tipo de post no BBdE ou noutros locais já agora :P , levam a:
Aquisição de:

Pinocchio



A versão do Winshluss?
Uma das melhores Bd's que já me passaram pelas mãos. :bow:
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 14 Sep 2014 22:46

Influenciado pelo Top do jornal Herald, aqui fica o meu, por ordem alfabética, dividido em cinco grupos:

50/41

Adele Blanc-Sec - As Múmias Loucas - Tardi

A Filha do Professor - Joann Sfar

Blacksad (Algures Entre as Sombras, e Alma Vermelha) - Juan Díaz Canales

Botlemess Belly Button - Dash Shaw's

Concrete - (Concrete Volume 2: Heights, Concrete Volume 3: Fragile Creature) - Paul Chadwick

It´s the War of the Trenches - Tardi

Nononba - Shigeru Mizuki

Pyongyang - Guy Deslise

Sleepwalk - Adian Tomine

Vampire Love - Joann Sfar



40/31

Book of Frank - Jim Woodring

Donjon Zenith - Lewis Trondheim

Gaston Lagaffe - Franquin

I Never Liked You - Chester Brown

Isaac o Pirata - Christophe Blain

Market day - James Sturm

Maus - Art Spiegelman

Os Companheiros do Crepúsculo - François Bourgeon

Os Jardins de Edena - Moebius

Toda a Mafalda - Quino



30/21

Alan’s War - Emmanuel Guibert

Big Question - Anders Nilsen

Blanketts - Craig Thompson

Boxers and Saints - Gene Luen Yang

Building Stories - Chris Ware

Dockwood - Jon McNaught

Essex County - Jeff Lemire

Goliath - Tom Gauld

Os Passageiros do Vento - François Bourgeon

Pedro e o Lobo- Miquelanxo Prado


20/11

Antes do Incal / O Incal - Moebius

Asterios Polyp - David Mazzucchelli

Bone - Jeff Smith

David Boring - Daniel Clowes

Death Ray - Daniel Clowes

Ice Heaven - Daniel Clowes

Locas - Jaime Hernandez

Onward Towards Our Noble Deaths - Shigeru Mizuki

Trilogia Nikopol - Enki Bilal

You are There - Tardi




10/1

Asterix - (Asterix e a Cleopatra, Asterix na Corsega, Obelix e Companhia) - Uderzo

Black Hole - Charles Burns

Ed the Happy Clown - Chester Brown

From Hell -Alan Moore

Jimmy Corrigan - Chris Ware

Palomar - Gilbert Hernandez

Peanuts (60º Aniversary) - Charles Schulz

Peter Pan - Loisel

Pinocchio - Winshluss

Tintin - (Tintin no Tibete, O Caso Girassol, As Joias de Catasfiore) - Hergé
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby annawen » 15 Sep 2014 16:23

Ignatius Wao wrote:Chris Ware é extraordinário. Embora a sua temática seja sempre a mesma, oportunidades perdidas, sonhos desfeitos, vidas desperdiçadas, o que é fascinante em Ware, é a forma como ele reproduz a experiência humana em toda a sua complexidade, riqueza e mundanidade, através de narrativas densas, quer na estrutura quer na história, com uma obsessão quase "doentia" pelo detalhe.
Os críticos americanos dizem que Ware está para BD, como James Joyce para a literatura, e eu acho que é uma comparação feliz.
Gosto tanto de Ware, que até comprei o boneco que está no meu avatar. :)


É verdade isso tudo o que dizes (só não posso comentar a referência a Joyce porque ainda não li Joyce :P ) mas as personagens, coitadas, são ou umas sofredoras ou umas canalhas exploradoras. É mesmo um universo muito cinzento, de muita solidão. Principalmente de muita solidão. Isto nos livros que li, é claro. O que admiro no Ware é mesmo a qualidade dos desenhos e a imaginação que ele tem em fazer aqueles extras como os falsos anúncios, os desdobráveis, o lettering, etc.

User avatar
Bugman
Edição Única
Posts: 4347
Joined: 24 Jun 2009 17:47
Location: Almada Capital
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Bugman » 25 Sep 2014 12:59

Eu estou ao contrário do T porque me sinto elitista ao só ter lido 5 dos mencionados. De qualquer forma, uma lista que contempla o Tintim e deixa de fora o Astérix não é para ser levada a sério... :P
A PENA online | O Bug Cultural

Normalcy was a majority concept, the standard of many and not the standard of just one man. Robert Neville
O homem que obedece a Deus, não precisa de outra autoridade. Petr Chelčický
Ao mesmo tempo que ali estava tudo igual, não estava você lá, não está teu passado, não está nada. Quer dizer: só você sabe que esteve ali. A parede, os prédios, não guardam a gente. Nós só nos guardamos a nós mesmos. Só valemos nós connosco. Fora daí é literatura, é poesia, é arte. Ferreira Gullar
Yes, I am a woman of the law. And there are lots of laws. But if they don't offer us justice, then they aren't laws! They are just lines drawn in the sand by men who would stand on your back for power and glory. Sartana
"No, Señoría, no es lo mismo estar dormido que estar durmiendo, porque no es lo mismo estar jodido que estar jodiendo". Camilo Jose Cela

User avatar
pco69
Cópia & Cola
Posts: 5487
Joined: 29 Apr 2005 23:13
Location: Fernão Ferro
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby pco69 » 02 Dec 2014 23:22

Ignatius Wao wrote:
pco69 wrote:Este tipo de post no BBdE ou noutros locais já agora :P , levam a:
Aquisição de:

Pinocchio



A versão do Winshluss?
Uma das melhores Bd's que já me passaram pelas mãos. :bow:

Li esta versão do Pinóquio este fim de semana. Para o Ignatius, o que vou dizer, será um crime de lesa-magestade, mas não fiquei muito impressionado com o livro.

Sim, é bom! As várias histórias dos vários personagens encandeiam-se com perfeição umas nas outras, mesmo quando não aparenta ter lógica tudo acaba por fazer sentido. Mas não achei que fosse extraordinário... :whistle:
Fenómenos desencadeantes de enfarte do miocárdio

Esforços físicos, stress psíquico, digestão de alimentos, coito, tempo frio, vento de frente e esforços a princípio da manhã.

Ou seja, é extremamente perigoso fazer sexo ao ar livre com vento de frente, após ter tomado o pequeno almoço numa manhã de inverno...

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 03 Dec 2014 23:31

pco69 wrote:Li esta versão do Pinóquio este fim de semana. Para o Ignatius, o que vou dizer, será um crime de lesa-magestade, mas não fiquei muito impressionado com o livro.

Sim, é bom! As várias histórias dos vários personagens encandeiam-se com perfeição umas nas outras, mesmo quando não aparenta ter lógica tudo acaba por fazer sentido. Mas não achei que fosse extraordinário... :whistle:

Herege :pissed:
No fim-de-semana, se tiver tempo, escrevo o contraditório. :twisted:
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes

User avatar
Ignatius Wao
Encadernado a Couro
Posts: 413
Joined: 06 Jan 2010 01:05
Location: Sintra
Contact:

Re: "The 50 greatest graphic novels of all Time"

Postby Ignatius Wao » 21 Dec 2014 22:55

Com algum atraso...

O Pinocchio de Winshluss é uma adaptação muito livre do Pinóquio de Carlo Collodi.

O Pinocchio desta versão não é um boneco de madeira, mas sim uma máquina de guerra (uma espécie de pequeno robot) criada por Gepetto, que pretende enriquecer com a venda da sua criação. Digamos que tudo corre mal a partir do momento que a mulher de Gepetto decide utilizar o nosso Pinocchio como… vibrador.

A partir daqui o album mostra-nos a viagem deste menino feito de metal, pelos reinos desencatados do mundo real (violência, guerra, preconceito, crueldade). O traço de Winshluss cria um personagem fascinante em sua aparência estática e inocente, pois ele é o contraponto da barbárie que o cerca. Ao mesmo tempo que inserido na história ele é totalmente ignorante a ela. A semelhança das histórias infantis, o Pinocchio é ingénuo. Suas atitudes são desprovidas de maldade, o que deixa ainda mais explícito o mundo cruel em que está inserido.
A história desenvolve-se atravéz de um mar de sangue, envolvendo violência, fanatismo religioso, exploração infantil e outras atrocidades. Winshluss faz uma série de críticas à sociedade actual e não poupa ninguém. Sua obra tem a todo momento, um teor em que a crueldade parece fazer parte da humanidade: quase todos os personagens agem em benefício próprio e não se importam em passar por cima de qualquer um para conseguir o que buscam. Pinóquio parece à margem disso tudo. Seu personagem não faz escolhas erradas, apenas é jogado de um lado para o outro, e as ações transcorrem fora do seu controle.

Com um conjunto de personagens sui generis, como um Gepetto patético, sete anões violadores, uma branca de neve lésbica, um serial killer, um investigador depressivo uma barata-escritora (Jiminy) que vive dentro do cérebro de Pinocchio e muitos outros, Winshluss constrói a sua obra a partir de pequenos capítulos e em histórias paralelas, que se intercalam e se entrecruzam. Todas estas personagens têm as suas próprias histórias, que vão-se intercalando com a história do nosso heroi, sem que Winshluss perca alguma vez o fio da meada.

Só a obra de arte que é o argumento e suas múltiplas significações, seria o suficiente para colocá-lo no panteão das grandes Bandas Desenhadas. No entanto este nem é ponto mais extraordinário da obra de Winshluss. A verdadeira força de Pinocchio está nos seus desenhos, na variação perfeita entre estilos que torna essa obra única, do ponto de vista estético. Quase todas as histórias são contadas apenas com imagens, sem falas, é com olhares, movimentos e expressões, acompanhados de diversos recursos gráficos, que as personagens comunicam com excecional eficácia, ações, ideias e intenções. A história da personagem principal, têm um tratamento gráfico de cores, que lembram as páginas de Bd, que eram publicadas nos jornais norte-americanos da primeira metade do século XX, as peripécias da barata Jiminy, com desenhos em preto e branco parecem saídas dos comics underground dos anos 1960, as partes nostálgicas do conto, são desenhadas em grafite em tons de sépia, os grandes desenhos de página inteira, aproximam-se esteticamente dos cartazes multicoloridos de filmes ou espetáculos circenses. Verdadeiramente extraordinário.
Se você agir sempre com dignidade, pode não melhorar o mundo, mas uma coisa é certa: haverá na Terra um canalha a menos. Millor Fernandes


Return to “Banda Desenhada”




  Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests